favorite vlogging camera ever no seriously

16. Apple iPhone 7 Best for: All vlogging

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Pros Cons
12 megapixel sensor, two cameras on back (f/1.8 aperture, f/2.8 aperture), 7 megapixel front-facing camera, optical image stabilisation More expensive than the Samsung Galaxy S7

Verdict: 3 out of 5

15. Samsung Galaxy S7 Best for: All vlogging

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Pros Cons
12 megapixel sensor, f/1.7 aperture, phase-detection autofocus, optical image stabilisation, cheaper than iPhone Only 5 megapixels on front-facing camera

Verdict: 3 out of 5

Placing the Samsung Galaxy S7 ahead of the iPhone 7 on this list is likely to displease a certain cohort of the population.

But I’ve got two good reasons.

The cameras on the iPhone 7 and the Galaxy S7 are almost one and the same. They’re not identical, but they’re close enough in quality that it’s more important to look at what else these devices have to offer in the way of a vlogging camera.

The S7 has a 12 megapixel camera, just like the iPhone 7. It has a slightly wider f/1.7 aperture on both its back and front-facing cameras, meaning you’ll fit more people in your frame. Samsung labored this point in its marketing campaign for the S7 earlier this year (trust me, I know: there was a huge billboard pointing out the S7’s “selfie” lens hanging outside my office window in Manhattan for months last summer). They’re right; it’s a great feature.

Then again, the iPhone 7 has an aperture of f/1,8, which is almost as wide.

The S7 also comes with improved autofocus, called Dual Pixel technology, I found the autofocus to be considerably slower on the iPhone 7.

The S7 has just the one camera, whereas the 7 comes with a second telephoto lens. Right now, Apple is using that to give you better zoom, but it’s under utilized. The company said it will be releasing software to allow you to create a shallow depth of field effect in portrait shots, which will give it a leg up on the S7 once released.

Because the iPhone 7 and Galaxy S7 have internet connections, and a huge library of apps, it’s possible to edit and upload videos to YouTube directly. This means it’s important to factor in, not just the cameras themselves, but the screen and audio playback quality on each handset.

The S7 has a 5.1-inch Super AMOLED display, with a resolution of 1,440 x 2,560 pixels. The iPhone 7 has a smaller screen, and it has Apple’s Retina display, with a resolution of 1,334 x 750. The difference is not massively noticeable — I would say the screen quality on both of these phones is pretty similar.

As for audio, the S7 is limited with its single speaker, unlike the iPhone 7, which has two. The S7 does have a headphone jack, unlike the iPhone 7, but this is probably a non-issue, as Apple provide an adapter to allow you to connect headphones to its new lightning adapter.

Still, as I said earlier, the Galaxy S7 is the winner here for two reasons. And they are battery life, and price.

Samsung advertises a talk time on the S7 of 22 hours. The battery lasts considerably less time if you’re shooting video, but it’s still a good deal better than the iPhone 7 Plus. With heavy usage of both devices, you’ll typically get at least an hour more out of the S7 than the iPhone. If you’ve ever been filming a vlog and run out of juice, you’ll understand that having that extra hour is hugely beneficial when you’re in a crunch.

There’s also the fact that the S7 is just a lot cheaper than the iPhone 7 Plus. I always factor price into my reviews, and I give Samsung major kudos for not raising their prices to meet the iPhone, which they easily could have done considering the quality of their devices.

Sorry, Apple, but this round goes to Samsung.

14. Canon PowerShot ELPH 360 Best for: Travel vlogging, Best for: At home vlogging

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Pros Cons
20.2 megapixel BSI-CMOS 1/2.3-inch sensor, 4.5-54mm f/3.6-f/7.0, 1080p at 30fps, 12x optical zoom, optical image stabilization, Wi-Fi No flip screen, no 60fps movie recording

Verdict: 3 out of 5

The Canon PowerShot ELPH 360 remains my favorite entry-level compact vlogging camera.

As a beginner’s compact camera, it doesn’t quite reach the heights of some of the more expensive cameras on this list, but that’s understandable. While it manages to shoot at 1080p, it only shoots at 30 frames per second, which means movement in your videos won’t look quite as smooth as it would at 60fps. Video quality also degrades in low light to a degree you won’t see in mid to high-range compacts.

Here’s what the ELPH 360 does better: Portability. It’s a tiny camera, weighing just 5.19 ounces, with dimensions of 3.92 x 2.28 x 0.90 inches. This camera will slip into your pocket easily, with room to spare. It also has a pretty decent battery life for such a small device, at 40 minutes.

13. Canon PowerShot SX720 Best for: Travel vlogging, Best for: At home vlogging

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Pros Cons
20.3 megapixel 1-inch CCD sensor, 24–960mm f/3.3–f/6.9 lens, 40x optical zoom, 1080p at 60fps, Wi-Fi No flip screen

Verdict: 3 out of 5

The Canon PowerShot SX720 is the bridge between cheap compact cameras for beginners, and high-end compacts like the Canon G7X and Sony RX100 lines.

It’s got a much longer, 40x optical zoom. That’s almost ten times longer than the G7X, which means this camera might to best suited to travel vlogging, where the ability to capture faraway subjects will definitely come in handy.

It’s also got a better battery than a lot of compact vlogging cameras, at 50 minutes. That doesn’t sound like loads, but more expensive alternatives struggle to break 30 minutes, let alone almost an hour.

There are some downsides. The higher aperture here (i.e. narrower lens) means this camera can’t create a shallow depth of field effect. While you can shoot at 1080p at 60 frames per second, video quality is worse toward the camera’s maximum focal length, and in low lighting conditions.

The G7X line also has a recurring problem: If you film while using autofocus, you’ll hear the whirring noise it makes in your footage. You can remove this sound in editing software (Final Cup Pro X, for example, has a setting to automatically remove unwanted noise).

But there is plenty on offer here if you’re a vlogger looking to upgrade from an entry-level compact camera, or your smartphone. It’s pretty affordable, too.

12. Canon PowerShot G7X Best for: All vlogging

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Pros Cons
20.2 megapixel 1-inch BSI-CMOS sensor, 1080p at 60fps, 24-100mm f/1.8-f/2.8 lens, flip screen (up only), touch screen, Wi-Fi, optical image stabilization Slippery to hold, screen not fully articulated, 4.2x optical zoom

Verdict: 3.25 out of 5

The Canon PowerShot G7X was a game-changer among YouTube vloggers. Creators like Roman Atwood use it on a daily basis. And with good reason.

The G7X has plenty of features you won’t find in a cheaper vlogging camera, such as a flip screen that’s touch sensitive, and fantastic picture quality even in low lighting conditions. But it comes with a few problems.

First, the autofocus on this camera is a little slow. Even in fair lighting, it can take the G7X a few seconds to focus on my face. It also has an annoying tendency when using autofocus, where it quickly jumps slightly out and into focus if I move around while filming. I often only notice this when I’m editing my footage.

To add to that, the flip screen on this device only flips 180 degrees upward, and doesn’t flip downward. It’s also a very slippery camera. If it weren’t for the wrist strap, I would drop this repeatedly. Then again, I’m a pretty clumsy person, so that could be a factor here.

As mentioned in my G7X review, if you film while using autofocus, you’ll hear the whirring noise it makes in your footage. To remove this sound, use editing software (Final Cup Pro X, for example, has a setting to automatically remove unwanted noise).

Despite these problems, videos shot at 1080p at 60 frames per second look satisfyingly detailed, and far beyond the capabilities of some of the most recent compact cameras. Unlike cheaper compacts, the G7X can produce an excellent shallow depth of field effect, which is where your subject is in focus, but your background is blurred out. It’s also a really simple camera to use, and reliable, too.

Canon has released a successor to the G7X, called the G7X Mark II, and it fixes some of these problems, so go for that if these issues are deal-breakers for you.

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